Panther Reads

“Range”

Math+teacher+and+varsity+girls%E2%80%99+soccer+coach+John+Bowen+is+currently+reading+%E2%80%9CRange%E2%80%9D+by+David+Eipstein.+The+text+makes+an+argument+against+overspecialization.

Annika Pepper

Math teacher and varsity girls’ soccer coach John Bowen is currently reading “Range” by David Eipstein. The text makes an argument against overspecialization.

Charlie Goins, Staff Writer

Math teacher and girls’ varsity soccer coach John Bowen is currently reading “Range” by David Eipstein.

“It talks about how our best feature almost as a human is our ability to take a big, abstract problem and be able to figure out a solution for it,” Bowen said. “That is much better accomplished when we don’t have a specialization, but we have experience in a lot of other things.”

“Range” argues that early specialization is not justified. It explains that if people have range in their abilities, they will be able to perform at a higher level than people who only specialize in one ability.

David Eiptein went to school at Columbia University and later was a senior writer for “Sports Illustrated.” His book “Range” was a #1 New York Times bestseller. He also wrote “The Sports Gene,” which talks about the needed genes to become a top athlete.

“In soccer, everybody is told since they are like [two years old] that if they are going to be good at soccer, that they are going to have to play soccer until they can’t play anymore, otherwise they will fall behind, and that just is not true,” Bowen said.

Any athlete, student, or individual aiming for success should take a look at “Range.”

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